Maroccan Lamb Tajine

We bought a beautiful Tajine! And it such good quality, and it was so cheap. Yeah thriftstore! I don’t think anybody ever used it. I guess they former owner did not get as excited as we did after scoring this Tajine. I sat straight to work. Must eat Lamb!

I am sure there are many options but my mind went straight to Lamb. I got some lambshoulder with bone, the butcher recommended that very strongly. He actually spend about ten minutes explaining what to do for my Tajine dish, not leaving out a single detail. After going on and on he almost shamefully admitted that he liked to cook. We noticed ;-). We did exactly what the nice men told us to do, alright, there were some adjustments,  and now I share this recipe with you!

Again it’s a wonderful dish to make: Tasty, healthy, not too complicated, fresh, international, exciting, colourful… I could go on…

This is also for you sis! Enjoy your new tajine as well :-).
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Here we go:

  • Lambshanks about 1 kilo
  • 1 diced onion
  • 2 crushed cloves of garlic
  • olive oil
  • freshly ground peper, salt
  • about a third of a small pumpkin, diced
  • 1 sweet potato, diced
  •  1 chili, seeds removed, very finely chopped
  • 2 tomatoes / half a can of tomatoes, diced
  • handful of apricots, roughly chopped
  • teaspoon of kurkuma
  • teaspoon of cumin
  • teaspoon of dried coriander
  • half a teaspoon of ginger
  • teaspoon of ras el hanout
  • teaspoon of curry powder
  • fresh coriander for garnishIMG_0876
  • juice of 1 lemon, optional.

Allright! Make sure you have all your vegies prepared. This stew is perfect to use leftover veggies, such as paprika, eggplant or potatoes as well. Put the tajine on the stove, heat two tablespoons of olive oil and brown of the meat.Remove meat from the tajine once browned and add the onions. Give it a stir and add the garlic and chili. You can use more or less then one chili, depending on your preference or tolerance for spicyness. Stir in the pumpkin and sweet potato. Once caramelized a little, add all the spices.

IMG_0800How does your kitchen smell now? Good I hope! Add the tomatoes and abricots. Do not forget to season with salt and pepper. Then you add the lamb again, make sure it is covered by the sauce. Put on the lid and let it simmer for 30 minutes – 1 hour.

The best way to check if it’s done is just to have a feel and taste. The meat should be soft and tender and also taste soft. I once left this stew for 2 hours and the meat just became softer!

We ate it with a simple couscous salad and some bread. Sprinkle over the fresh coriander. You can also sprinkle over some lemon juice for some freshness.

 

>> You can make this in a normal pot as well

>> This dish is perfect for freezing!

>> There are several health claims saying kurkuma can be beneficial when suffering from Parkinsons disease or Alzheimers

>> You can use the ras el hanout to spice your couscous as well. Just mix the couscous with a large tablespoon before you pore over the boiling water.
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Celeriac Fritters with harissa-yoghurt dip

Hi all!

How are you? The weather here is great, so I haven’t been spending that much time in the kitchen here! Sitting in my living room, I am bathing in the sun right now, thinking up a new recipe for this week.

I wasn’t really inspired so for my grocery shopping I cycled down to a local market, right in the city, quite close to our home. Walking in the sun you hardly realize its autumn already, but the produce helped reminding me. Pumpkin, celeriac, potatoes, all sorts of produce for an autumn or winter dish, although I didn’t really feel like making some sort of mash already, way too early! I did buy the celeriac however and ended up making celeriac cakes! Something light and it made me think of summer – perfect picnic food no?

If autumn does set in all of a sudden you can have them with a nice piece of fish or meat but I just had them for lunch with a green salad and some harissa-yoghurt sauce.

Here it goes:

 

For the celeriac cakes:

Half a celeriac, peeled and grated

Half a sjalot, very finely diced.

Fresh (or otherwise dried) thyme

Peper and salt

2 tablespoons of flour (any type will do)

1 tablespoon of spicy mustard

½ teaspoon of Cajun herbs

1 free-range egg.

Olive oil (coconut oil or sunflower oil work well too)

 

For the harissa sauce:

3 tablespoons Thick yoghurt, such as Greek or Turkish yoghurt

1 teaspoon of harissa

 

Mix the grated celeriac with all the ingredients. Fresh thyme works really well with celeriac, it is just a really good flavor combination I think. If you do not have Cajun spice, perhaps you have some cayenne pepper or paprika powder to add to the mixture.  I like my mustard a bit spicy, but ofcourse, if you have a milder mustard it will definitely work as well. Give the mixture a good stir to make sure all is properly mixed.

Heat two tablespoons of oil in a large skillet. Start scooping in the celeriac mixture with a spoon and press several heaps of mixture into the pan. You can shape them a little, until you have your desired shape and size.

They need at least 5 minutes on both sides, until golden brown. Keep a close eye on them, they may need a minute less or more.

When golden brown status has been achieved, put them on some paper kitchen towels while you whip up the sauce. When I say this sauce is easy I really mean it! It’s just some yoghurt and harissa. Harissa is a red pepper paste, while reading the ingredientslist I see that harissa is from Tunesia, did not know that! It’s mainly peppers, with some garlic, salt and coriander.  It’s perfect for spicing up soups or tomato sauces. And also for tasty dips!

Mix the yoghurt with the harissa. You can adjust to your own flavor, depending how much spicy you like it.

Serve them warm and crispy. Good work well as an evening meal with some fresh green salad and a piece of salmon from the oven, I am guessing. Or as a picnic snack, the sun is still shining here!

 

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yeah well I am no fan of these photo’s either… but this is how they turned out! Besides that they looked way better and tastier in real life!

Note to self: Practice your foodfotography…